Small Dogs Require Extra Care During the Holiday Season

Small Dogs Require Extra Care During the Holiday Season

The Holiday season is a time of joy and celebration. To keep it that way for everyone, people with small dogs should take some common-sense precautions. Especially now, when tiny dogs are increasingly popular, families need to stay aware of their special needs.
Most people know that chocolate can be lethal to dogs. But other Holiday favorites can also pose hazards, including: turkey, pork, onions, even raisins and grapes. Other foods may simply be too spicy or rich for the dog’s digestive system to handle. While a single raisin or grape may not seem like much, it could be a toxic meal to a four-pound dog.
With holiday decorations coming out of their boxes, keep an eye on that little dog. It may be fun to play “chase the tinsel” with your Chihuahua, but if she swallows some when you’re not paying attention, the consequences could be dire. That ornament may look a lot like your little dog’s favorite ball. Poinsettias and many other plants, including lilies, are poisonous to dogs.
Small dog owners also need to pay attention to their little pets when company arrives. Even the best-socialized little dog may feel threatened and defensive in a crowd. Just think of how the room looks to your shin-height dog when your Holiday Party is in full swing! The obstacle course of potentially damaging feet is intimidating, to say the least! Toddlers who move erratically or grab tails may be frightening to a tiny dog. Small children and dogs of any size should not be left alone together.
Pay attention to your small dog’s location. Dogs can slip outside with the constant opening and closing of doors. Some can climb onto counters and tables. They can even disappear under a pile of coats! The most tragic tale we’ve heard is of a small dog, taking advantage of a warm, cozy visitor’s bed, was killed when a folding bed was put away for the day. Small dogs don’t make much of a lump under the covers and the owners just didn’t see him. Very sad, and very easy to avoid – just find the dog before you move the furniture.
Paying attention is the key to a happy and safe holiday season for the entire family – including your toy dog.